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The small town of Kvasice lies on the banks of the Morava River at the southern tip of the Haná plain, at the foot of the Chřiby Mountains, ten kilometers south of Kromeriz. The written history of the manor house and the parish dates back to the 12th century. Today's parish belongs to the Deanery of Kroměříž in the Archdiocese of Olomouc. It also includes five other municipalities: Bělov, Nová Dědina, Karolín, Sulimov and Střížovice - see below. Mapka.

There are about 250 parishioners attending Sunday services, and several communities (children, youth, parents, seniors) regularly meet on issues of living faith in daily life. Regular Sunday entertainment programs are designed for all children in the village. During the school year, religion is being taught, and the church school enriches the musical experience throughout the year. The parish church is open to concerts and ecumenical festivals. Many parishioners are involved in the study of history, there is a parish library available, the bookstore arrives regularly in the parish.

The parish administrator is P. Piotr Koloch OMI. It is possible to negotiate sacraments of baptism, reconciliation, marriages, visits to sick and funerals, and counseling in spiritual life.

From the Gothic era comes today's filial church in the cemetery, the parish church near the castle (both dedicated to the Nabebevzetí P. Marie) and most other monuments gave the richest Baroque period. The facade of the beauties is decorated with richly painted sundial, there are two chapels in the village, the statue of St. Jana Nep. And more stone crosses. In a deplorable state, the Vandals are a damaged Baroque crusade to the Calvary (along the road to the New Day).

The Beauty of the Czech Republic and Best Places to Visit

The Czech Republic is that hidden beauty which at times can be over shadowed by the glamour of other European countries. But if you take the time to travel there, you will not be disappointed. It’s the charming destination that is reminiscent of the ‘Real Europe’ where you can gaze at old architecture that was left untouched by the ravages of war. It is also a place of architectural interest because of the many influences exerted by the various nations that controlled the area. Let’s take a look at what interesting places you could visit should you decide to journey there.

  • Prague

jobs-in-prague-and-czech-republic-what-are-your-chances-of-getting-a-job02This has to be on the top of the list. The capital of the Czech Republic, Prague is a city which is culturally and architecturally diverse with highlights from different centuries imprinted upon its landscape. The Vltava snakes its way around, contributing to 1100 years of history and culture in the capital city. There is much to see here, from Kafka’s home to the Giant Metronome, the picturesque Charles Bridge, castles and much more.

  • Cesky Krumlov

c-cesky-krumlov-castle-museum-1This ‘Bohemian’ town is located in Krumlov and features a large Bohemian castle that dates back to the thirteenth century when the region was owned by the Bohemians. The town itself has not changed much since the eighteenth century and with all buildings well restored, it is a joy to behold as you walk through the medieval town. The cobblestoned streets meander through colorful stucco facades and it is this combination that makes Cesky Krumlov such a quaint place for anyone to visit.

  • Kutna Hora

RELA-243-Kutna-Hora_kasnaThere are a number of spectacular gothic buildings in this area due to German control back in the 12thcentury. This was a Bohemian monastery in 1142 and found prosperity when a large silver deposit was found nearby. Places that you absolutely must visit include the five-naved Cathedral, the Italian Court which is the royal residence and mint, a museum known as the Stone Haus and the Ossuary which is the bone house. All sound intriguing and definitely warrant a visit.

  • Karlovy Vary

Karlovy_Vary_CzechThe healing waters of this hot spring town attract thousands of visitors where the miracle waters cure hundreds of ailments. Developed into a large spa region, the buildings all reflect the opulence of the nobles who resided there whilst getting their spa treatments. The town dates back hundreds of years to the 13th century when it was commissioned by Charles IV. Although many natural disasters have inflicted damage on the architecture, the town is still picturesque and the spa is still operational centuries after it was established.

  • Castle Karlstejn

c-karlstejn-castle-1This castle was the home of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV and is located nearby to the capital city of Prague which makes it a great destination for a day trip. The castle itself has served many purposes, from a royal residence to a war fortress and even a storehouse for treasure! Designed in three terraced levels, it was occupied from lowest to highest, by the Knights and the Emperor, by the empress and by God on the topmost tower where a chapel was built.

  • Telc

maxresdefaultCreated as a port town in the 14th century, Telc is located in the Moravia region. It was a point of trade between Bohemia, Moravia and Austria and is known for its Easter Egg colored buildings as well as its renaissance architecture.  There is a local Gothic palace that was redone in the Renaissance style in the 17th century as well as beautiful churches that would make a perfect location for photographers.

 

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Exploring the Czech Republic: Fun Cultural Facts

Many people wish to visit the beautiful country of the Czech Republic and the citizens of the country will be glad to know that you are aware of the beautiful country with its crown jewel being Prague. But it would make them feel really proud if you knew more about their country and culture. So here are a few interesting facts that would reveal to you who the Czechs really are.

  • The Czech Republic has one of the highest densities of castles in the entire world with over 2,000 castles, castle ruins and keeps calling this country home.
  • The Czech Republic is almost entirely bordered on all sides by mountains. This means that no matter which season you visit, you will have something to do – from sightseeing in the busy summer months of July and August to snow activities in winter.
  • This sounds like an amazing fact, but the Czechs love their beer. No I’m not joking – the love it so much that they are the world’s heaviest consumers of beer. If you’re a beer lover, you’ll be in beer heaven!
  • They know how to make money. The GDP per capita of Prague is higher than any other EU state and is also twice the Czech national average.
  • This is the destination for atheists. Only about 19% of Czechs say that they believe in God.
  • As mentioned earlier, the Czech Republic is a castle haven that can fascinate any history or architectural buff. In fact, Prague Castle is given the honor of being the largest and oldest castle in the world and is listed accordingly in the Guinness Book of Records.
  • The country is actually made of up of two kingdoms – the Kingdom of Bohemia and the March of Moravia.
  • For all the sick people, this country has good news. The country has more hospital beds per inhabitant in the EU, so you know you’ll get taken care of if you fall sick.
  • Although the country is land locked and is bordered by mountains on nearly all sides, the highest elevation in the Czech Republic is only 1,602 m in height which belongs to Snezka.
  • The Czech Republic was ranked as the 5th best country in the world by Reporters without Borders.
  • They are just as passionate about their spas as they are about their beer. The country is known for its many spa towns which mushroomed along the border with Saxony.
  • This country’s main source of revenue is tourism. So help boost the Czech economy and put on your travelling shoes and head to this lovely European country.
  • The oldest university in Eastern Europe is located in Prague and it is the Charles University which was founded in 1348. It is one of the oldest in the world in continuous operation and according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities in 2006 by Shanghai Jiao Tong University; it was ranked as the leading University in Eastern Europe.
  • The Czechs do have the moolah – the country is the second richest East European after tiny Slovenia.
  • If you’re wondering what contributions did the Czech do to society and generally to the world, the large car manufacturer Skoda is actually Czech. The country also produced Martina Navratilova who is considered to be the best female Tennis player in the world.
  • Bohemia was a duchy in the 9th century and was elevate to a kingdom in 1198. The early kings of Bohemia all belonged to the powerful House of Luxembourg and also combined the title of the Holy Roman Emperor.

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Tips for Travelers: Going off the Beaten Path

The Czech Republic is a beautiful country located in Europe and also happens to be one of the most affordable places to visit which is a huge plus for travel hungry people. It is characterized by its fairy tale architecture that dates back centuries, a heritage that is as rich as the nobles who inhabited the area, tales of Bohemian kings which are regaled in folklore and music, and quaint towns that boasts cobble stoned streets with beautiful castles that dot the Czech countryside. With abundant natural beauty, the Czech Republic is ranked amongst the top places to see in Europe. But what should a traveler do if he wants to go off the beaten track? Here are a few places that you could visit should you wish to be different from the multitudes that visit the country every year.

 

  • Adrspach, Teplice Rocks

DSC_0510This is located around a hundred miles away from Prague and is a National Park that consists of sandstone that has gradually eroded over the years to create amazing rock formations. There is a marked pathway for those who are adventurous enough to try the three hour walk which takes you past many of these formations which are interestingly named the Caterpillar, the Sphinx, the Golem, Butcher’s Axe and more.

 

 

  • Art Deco Imperial Hotel Bar and Café

1580712_115_zSightseeing can be a tiring business and what better way to relax after a long day traipsing through the cobblestone streets than with a cocktail at this posh hotel. It may come across as hoity-toity, but everyone is welcome, dust and all. The décor, as the name suggests is full of art nouveau mosaics, so sit back, relax and enjoy the surroundings.

 

 

 

  • Beer Gardens

bohemian-hall-and-beer-garden-4f32eca4ed306100010000fdAny enthusiastic traveler who wants to wind down with a cold pint is welcome to visit the number of beer gardens that are located in parks all around the city of Prague. Relax on a lazy afternoon at the Letenské Park and listen to someone strumming a guitar. If you’re feeling peckish, head to the restaurant in a neo-Renaissance chateau in the park for a treat.

 

 

  • Petrin tower

prague-1148732_960_720Experience travelling in the countryside with a one day travel pass and take the number 22 tram across the Voltava River and then take the funicular railway up Petrin Hill. The tower itself bears striking resemblance to the Eiffel Tower and sways lightly in the wind. Exercise your legs by climbing up the 299 wooden steps or take the easy way in a lift to have a spectacular view of the countryside.

 

 

  • Brno

brnoThis is a great alternative place to visit to Prague. You will find no fast food restaurants here and only bars and quaint restaurants that serve chilled beer and great food. Visit the Silberk which is the old fortress and the cathedral – all of which can be reached by foot or even by the excellently connected tram system.

 

 

 

  • Litomysl Castle

protected-castle-in-litomysl-czech-republic-1600x1044This is on the UNESCO world heritage list and its baroque theater which seats 150 people is one of only five in the whole world. You’ll find Renaissance and Baroque buildings at every corner and the monastery gardens along with the sculptures make for a good attraction.

 

 

 

  • Kromeriz and Mikulov

kromeriz_vThese two towns lie in Southern Moravia and are well connected by cycling routes. Take in the sights as you ride your bikes past the Morava River, take in the scent of flowering lime trees and pass by palaces, gardens, cafes and more. You could spend a good hour or two tasting wines at the Radnicni Restaurant which offers a tasting menu of all the local wines.

 

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Roman Catholic parish Kvasice

Roman Catholic parish Kvasice

The small town of Kvasice lies on the banks of the Morava River at the southern tip of the Haná plain, at the foot of the Chřiby Mountains, ten kilometers south of Kromeriz. The written history of the manor house and the parish dates back to the 12th century. Today's parish belongs to the Deanery of Kroměříž in the Archdiocese of Olomouc. It also includes five other municipalities: Bělov, Nová Dědina, Karolín, Sulimov and Střížovice - see below. Mapka.
There are about 250 parishioners attending Sunday services, and several communities (children, youth, parents, seniors) regularly meet on issues of living faith in daily life. Regular Sunday entertainment programs are designed for all children in the village. During the school year, religion is being taught, and the church school enriches the musical experience throughout the year. The parish church is open to concerts and ecumenical festivals. Many parishioners are involved in the study of history, there is a parish library available, the bookstore arrives regularly in the parish.
The parish administrator is P. Piotr Koloch OMI. It is possible to negotiate sacraments of baptism, reconciliation, marriages, visits to sick and funerals, and counseling in spiritual life.
From the Gothic era comes today's filial church in the cemetery, the parish church near the castle (both dedicated to the Nabebevzetí P. Marie) and most other monuments gave the richest Baroque period. The facade of the beauties is decorated with richly painted sundial, there are two chapels in the village, the statue of St. Jan Nepomuk and more stone crosses. In a deplorable state, the Vandals are a damaged Baroque crusade to the Calvary (along the road to the New Day).

Parrish History

The first written mention of the church comes from Kvasická r. Spytihněvského provost from 1141. Other documents are from the 14th century, when the old church on the hill belonged wooden rectory, destroyed during the Thirty Years War. At a time when local estate owners alternated different faiths, there was a tower annexe to původníku Gothic church (now a branch in the cemetery). After r. 1581 he remained vacant parish, later since. 1603 is canceled and the church passed into the hands of Czech Brethren. Catholic worship at that time moved to the old chapel at Marianová.

Since r. 1626 the Spiritual Administration takes the Jesuit order of Kromeriz. After gaining dominion Janem Rottalem, the church was repaired and called priests from Poland. Managing Kvasická parish at that time also included Tlumacov. In the 80s of the 17th century it was built opposite the cemetery. In the early 18th century, the parish grew for the souls of the many surrounding villages and new. Even before the completion of construction of the new dignified Baroque church in the year. 1740 was also started construction of a new parish with large outbuildings and beautiful sundial . At that time, the pastor kvasickým educated and enterprising Matthew P. Moritz, who is credited with building the chapel and monument to Vrážisku, left valuable. parish library.

Important administrators Kvasická parishes were, for example. Joseph P. Bílek (1846-1862), dean of the deanery zdouneckého in which then belonged to the parish Kvasická, P. Vincenc Vašek (1862-1869), who was also the former head of the Economic Unity Záhlinická-Kvasická, also fled P. Vincenc (1869-1881) known for his good-natured and pěstitelstvím silkworms, P. Josef Mádr (1881-1917), who established a foundation for poor citizens, P. Ignác Němec (1886-1920), makes the installation of the organ, electric lighting of the church and the new Czech written chronicle.

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